Research Reports

Discover a wealth of social sector knowledge through reports from experts, foundations, nonprofits, and research institutions working in education.

  • Summer Learning Findings Report: 2017 Summer Programs
  • Minnesota Early Childhood Initiative: Supporting Minnesota’s Youngest Citizens Lessons Learned 2003-2006
  • Learning From Student Voice: Are Students Engaged?
  • 2015-2016 Summer Melt Texting Initiative: Lessons Learned on What it Takes to Launch a Program
  • Summer Learning Findings Report: 2017 Summer Programs

    Summary

    Out-of-school time (OST) programs, especially summer programs, offer critical support to schools, youth, and their families. Research indicates that OST programs are more than just a safe haven for youth. High quality OST programs can support youth academically and socially.  Some studies show that minorities and youth in low-income communities benefit even more than their more affluent peers suggesting that OST programs are especially important for these young people.

    Public schools in Oakland serve a large proportion of youth who typically benefit from additional learning supports, including students from low-income households (73%) and English Learners (31%). High quality OST programs provide additional opportunities for youth to practice the academic and social skills they need to succeed. 

  • Minnesota Early Childhood Initiative: Supporting Minnesota’s Youngest Citizens Lessons Learned 2003-2006

    Summary

    The story of the early childhood coalitions organized by the six Minnesota Initiative Foundations in Greater Minnesota.

  • Learning From Student Voice: Are Students Engaged?

    Summary

    When students have a love of learning and a desire to succeed ─ when they are genuinely engaged with their school and their education ─ they are more likely to learn. Since student engagement is a leading indicator of academic achievement and persistence in school as well as a key element of school climate, educators can greatly benefit from measuring it. So, what does engagement look like, according to the students themselves? To answer this question, YouthTruth analyzed survey responses from over 230,000 students in grades three through twelve. The data was gathered between November 2012 and June 2017 through YouthTruth's anonymous online climate and culture survey, administered in partnership with school districts and charter management organizations across 36 states. Our analysis looked at a subset of questions related to student engagement and uncovered some key insights.

  • 2015-2016 Summer Melt Texting Initiative: Lessons Learned on What it Takes to Launch a Program

    Summary

    At Great Lakes we focus on helping students of color, students from low-income families and those who are the first in theirfamilies to attend college. These underserved students have the most to gain from earning a degree or credential, but face the steepest challenges in getting there. One of the first barriers they need to overcome is "summer melt." The purpose of this report is to share lessons learned by three high school districts during the development and launch of a summer melt texting program.

Statistics

Compare how much foundation funding goes to nine different sub-areas in education.

  • Total Number of Recipients

    2011: 10993 recipients, 2012: 11873 recipients
  • Total Number of Grants

    2011: 27375 grants, 2012: 31050 grants