Research Reports

Discover a wealth of social sector knowledge through reports from experts, foundations, nonprofits, and research institutions working in education.

  • Changing How High Schools Serve Black and Latino Young Men: A Report on New York City's Expanded Success Initiative
  • Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California
  • Pathways to an Elite Education: Application, Admission, and Matriculation to New York City's Specialized High Schools (Working Paper)
  • Impacts of the Teach For America Investing in Innovation Scale-Up
  • Changing How High Schools Serve Black and Latino Young Men: A Report on New York City's Expanded Success Initiative

    Summary

    A growing number of initiatives around the country are attempting to tackle longstanding inequities, including higher rates of school dropout, incarceration, and unemployment among Black and Latino men. New York City's Young Men's Initiative (YMI) has been at the forefront of these efforts since it was launched in 2011 to address disparities in education, employment, health, and criminal justice.

    YMI's educational component, the Expanded Success Initiative (ESI), focuses on the issue of low college readiness among Black and Latino male students -- a problem that has persisted in NYC even as high school graduation rates have risen. ESI is providing funding and professional development to 40 NYC high schools, aimed at helping them improve outcomes, particularly college and career readiness, among their Black and Latino male students.

    The Research Alliance for New York City Schools is conducting a four-year evaluation of ESI's implementation and impact. This report, Changing How Schools Serve Black and Latino Young Men, presents our findings from Year 2 of ESI (the 2013-2014 school year), drawing on interviews and focus groups with staff at ESI schools and a set of matched comparison schools, a student survey, and an analysis of student achievement data.

  • Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California

    Summary

    The After School Division (ASD) of the California Department of Education in collaboration with Public Profit, has released Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California. This report shares high-level information about the availability of technical assistance (TA) by region, strategy, and links to Quality Standards for Expanded Learning. Regional Profiles provide at-a-glance information about providers in each of California's 11 regions.

    This report will help to inform the ongoing conversations about how to support high quality Expanded Learning Opportunities in California for all youth. California is a national leader in Expanded Learning, both for the breadth of its publicly funded Expanded Learning programs and for its growing focus on quality. THe ASD is further enhancing its supports for program quality through the System of Support, including fuding for TA. Understanding the current TA landscape enahnces the ASD's ability to make strategic investments to support Expanded Learning Opportunities.

  • Pathways to an Elite Education: Application, Admission, and Matriculation to New York City's Specialized High Schools (Working Paper)

    Summary

    New York City's elite public specialized high schools have a long history of offering a rigorous college preparatory education to the City's most academically talented students. Though immensely popular and highly selective, their policy of admitting students on the basis of a single entrance exam has been heavily criticized. Many argue, for example, that the policy inhibits diversity at the schools, which are predominately Asian, White, and male. In this paper, we provide a descriptive analysis of the "pipeline" from middle school to matriculation at a specialized high school, identifying group-level differences in rates of application, admission, and enrollment unexplained by measures of prior achievement. These differences serve to highlight points of intervention to improve access for under-represented groups. We also look at the role of middle schools in the pipeline, examining the distribution of offers across middle schools and testing for middle school effects on application and admission. Finally, we simulate the effects of alternative admissions rules on the composition of students at the specialized high schools.

  • Impacts of the Teach For America Investing in Innovation Scale-Up

    Summary

    In 2010, Teach For America (TFA) launched a major expansion effort, funded in part by a five-year Investing in Innovation (i3) scale-up grant of $50 million from the U.S. Department of Education.

    Using a rigorous random assignment design to examine the effectiveness of TFA elementary school teachers in the second year of the i3 scale-up, Mathematica Policy Research found that first- and second-year corps members recruited and trained during the scale-up were as effective as other teachers in the same high-poverty schools in both reading and math. To estimate the effectiveness of TFA teachers relative to the comparison teachers, we compared end-of-year test scores of students assigned to the TFA teachers and those assigned to the comparison teachers. Because students in the study were randomly assigned to teachers, we can attribute systematic differences in achievement at the end of the study school year to the relative effectiveness of TFA and comparison teachers, rather than to the types of students taught by these two different groups of teachers. In addition to the impact analysis described in this report, the evaluation included an implementation analysis that describes key features of TFA's program model and its implementation of the i3 scale-up.

Statistics

Compare how much foundation funding goes to nine different sub-areas in education.

  • Total Number of Recipients

    2011: 10993 recipients, 2012: 11873 recipients
  • Total Number of Grants

    2011: 27375 grants, 2012: 31050 grants