New Opportunities for Interest-Driven Arts Learning in a Digital Age

Arts and Culture, Computers and Technology, Education and Literacy

New Opportunities for Interest-Driven Arts Learning in a Digital Age

Traditionally in the United States, schools and after-school programs have played a promi-nent part in teaching young people about the arts. Arts education has been waning in K-12 public schools in recent times, however. This is especially true in low-income communities, where public schools have often cut back on arts instruction so they can devote limited public education dollars to subjects such as writing and math that are the focus of high-stakes standardized tests.

When we look outside of school, however, we see a strikingly different landscape, one full of promise for engaging young people in artistic activity. What makes this landscape possible is an eagerness to explore that springs from youths' own creative passions -- what we call "interest-driven arts learning" -- combined with the power of digital technology.

This report is a step in trying to understand the new territory. It gives a rundown of scholarship in the areas of arts and out-of-school-hours learning; offers a framework for thinking about interest-driven arts learning in a digital age; examines young people's media consumption; provides a survey of youths' creative endeavors online and elsewhere, along with a look at the proliferation of technologies that young people are using in the arts; and concludes with thoughts about challenges and possibilities for the future

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

Arts and Culture, Children and Youth, Education and Literacy

ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

This is the final performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program.

The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. Over three years from 2008 to 2010, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 63 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California-San Francisco County-San Francisco

State of the Arts in Chicago Public Schools: Baseline Report 2012-2013

Arts and Culture;Education and Literacy

State of the Arts in Chicago Public Schools: Baseline Report 2012-2013

Over the past three decades, countless educational, cultural, and philanthropic leaders have worked tirelessly to improve access to the arts for all students in Chicago Public Schools. Since its inception in 2011, Ingenuity has been working in partnership with these same leaders toward the goal of an arts education for every student in every CPS school. Ingenuity underpins its work by gathering a deep set of data that provides a clear understanding of the specific arts needs of each school and the district as a whole. This report presents findings from the first year of comprehensive data collection, the 2012 -- 13 school year, and sets the baseline against which Ingenuity will annually measure district-wide efforts to expand arts instruction.

Nearly four hundred schools participated in this data collection, which makes this report the most current, comprehensive view of arts education in Chicago. This report also offers an analysis of progress on the CPS Arts Education Plan and shows data related to its implementation in schools. The key to looking at the state of arts in the city's schools is taking a closer look at some of the Plan's high-level goals, which stand out as central to its overall progress.

  • Make the arts a core subject by dedicating 120 minutes of arts instruction per week in elementary schools. (1a)
  • Create a system to track the quantity of elementary-level arts instruction. (5a)
  • Set minimum staffing requirements in the arts at one certified full-time employee per school or an improved ratio. (1d)
  • Require each school to maintain a budget for the arts. (6a)
  • Match at least one community arts partner to every school in collaboration with an arts, or other instructor. (4b)
  • Launch the Creative Schools Certification to establish school and network-level supports to help principals plan for and implement the arts. (3c)
  • Integrate the arts into the school progress report card. (5d)

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Chicago Metropolitan Area

Lloyd A. Fry Foundation 2010 Annual Report

Community and Economic Development, Education and Literacy, Nonprofits and Philanthropy

Lloyd A. Fry Foundation 2010 Annual Report

Contains board chair's message, executive director's message, program information, grant guidelines, grants list, and lists of board members and staff. 2010 financial statements available at separate link.

Geographic Focus:

What School Leaders Can Do to Increase Arts Education

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

What School Leaders Can Do to Increase Arts Education

Learning in and through the arts develops the essential knowledge, skills, and creative capacities all students need to succeed in school, work, and life. As the top building-level leaders, school principals play a key role in ensuring every student receives a high-quality arts education as part of a complete education.

In a time of shrinking budgets and shifting priorities, what can school principals do to make and keep the arts strong in their schools? This guide offers three concrete actions school principals can take to increase arts education in their schools:

A -establish a school-wide commitment to arts learning;

B -create an arts-rich learning environment; and

C - rethink the use of time and resources.

Each action is supported with several low-cost or no-cost strategies that other school leaders have used and found to be effective -- whether it's beginning an arts program where none exists, making an existing program stronger, or preserving an arts program against future cuts. While many of the strategies are drawn from elementary schools, they are likely to be applicable in a variety of grade levels.

Mounting research evidence confirms that students in schools with arts-rich learning environments academically outperform their peers in arts-poor schools. Where the arts are an integral component of the school day, they positively impact student attendance, persistence and engagement; enhance teacher effectiveness; and strengthen parent and community involvement. Research also shows school principals serve as the primary decision makers as to whether and to what extent the arts are present within a school.

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) prepared this guide, with support from the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH). The increasingly critical role of school leaders, along with the growing body of evidence on the benefits of arts learning, summarized most recently in a new report published by the PCAH prompted the development of the guide.

AEP staff reviewed the relevant literature as well as conducted personal interviews with school principals and with practitioners who work closely with principals. School principals and other leaders interested in increasing arts education in America's schools can adopt any of these actions and strategies one at a time or implement several at once. When taken together as part of an overall approach, however, their effects are more likely to be cumulative,

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

Arts and Culture, Children and Youth, Education and Literacy

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

This is the third of three performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program.

The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residences emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2009-2010 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 18 classrooms from four schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California-San Francisco County-San Francisco

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