Funding the Common Core State Standards: What Have We Learned the Last Three Years?

Education and Literacy;Government Reform

Funding the Common Core State Standards: What Have We Learned the Last Three Years?

Common Core Funders Working Group leaders commissioned a capstone paper to capture insights from participants in various Working Group activities, including national and regional funders and field leaders in state policy, district implementation, professional development and teacher associations. We asked questions about the turning points in Common Core implementation, about funder roles and influence and about what they believed philanthropy should take away from its support efforts to date.

The resulting report, "Funding the Common Core State Standards: What Have We Learned the Last Three Years?" summarizes our findings and offers new food for thought for funders seeking to move forward in their support of both the Common Core State Standards and other ambitious education systems change efforts.

July 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Looking Back to Move Ahead: Lessons for Effective Communications to Support Implementation of Common Core-Aligned Assessments

Education and Literacy

Looking Back to Move Ahead: Lessons for Effective Communications to Support Implementation of Common Core-Aligned Assessments

In the spring of 2015, large numbers of districts across the country will begin releasing scores on new, Common Core-aligned assessments. These scores will provide us with an initial look at how well our students are prepared for college and career based on the higher bar set by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Despite widespread adoption by most of the nation in 2010, according to the 2013 PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools, 62 percent of respondents say they have never heard of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

To help prepare education practitioners and advocates for the changes ahead, we examined how recent changes in state assessments were communicated to stakeholders, and the results of those efforts. We interviewed parents, district and school administrators, state education officials, education advocates, union representatives and school board members in states that made changes to their assessments or cut scores in order to raise the bar of student expectations similar to Common Core-aligned assessments efforts now.

The findings offer a lens into what works for system leaders eager to develop strong support for new CCSS assessments and their overall efforts to ensure that all students graduate from high school ready for college and career.

November 2013

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Opportunity by Design: New High School Models for Student Success

Education and Literacy

Opportunity by Design: New High School Models for Student Success

Schools throughout the country will soon begin to implement the Common Core State Standards and adopt the Next Generation Science Standards. These new standards, which are "fewer, clearer, and higher" than existing state standards, are designed to provide all young people with the knowledge and skills they need for success in a global economy.

Though they are a powerful tool for improving our educational system, standards alone cannot deliver widespread, meaningful change. To bring all students to much higher levels of achievement and to help underprepared students catch up to meet the standards' new demands, we must "do school differently." This means redesigning how schools use teaching, time, technology, and money to create opportunities for more young people to succeed. And, it means replacing existing one-size-fits-all approaches with rigorous, personalized learning that creates multiple opportunities for students to be successful.

Individual interventions are important, yet by themselves, they are not likely to produce sufficiently strong outcomes to help all students meet the demands of the new standards. Instead of retooling individual elements such as teacher preparation, learning time, or technology in isolation, all the elements that we know work and some emerging tools must be integrated into comprehensive school designs that will truly meet the needs of every student.

March 2013

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Informing Writing: The Benefits of Formative Assessment

Education and Literacy;Health;Nonprofits and Philanthropy;Poverty

Informing Writing: The Benefits of Formative Assessment

Examines whether classroom-based formative writing assessment - designed to provide students with feedback and modified instruction as needed - improves student writing and how teachers can improve such assessment. Suggests best practices.

September 2011

Geographic Focus: North America-United States;Africa

Future Shock: Early Common Core Implementation Lessons from Ohio

Education and Literacy

Future Shock: Early Common Core Implementation Lessons from Ohio

The Thomas B. Fordham Institute has long advocated for high quality academic content standards nationally- and in our home state of Ohio. The Buckeye State committed itself to adopting more rigorous academic content standards in 2010: Ohio is one of 45 states and the District of Columbia that has adopted the Common Core standards in math and English language arts, and will implement them by the start of the 2014-15 school year.

May 2012

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio

Putting a Price Tag on the Common Core: How Much Will Smart Implementation Cost?

Education and Literacy

Putting a Price Tag on the Common Core: How Much Will Smart Implementation Cost?

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English language arts and mathematics represent a sea change in standards-based reform and their implementation is the movement's next -- and greatest -- challenge. Yet, while most states have now set forth implementation plans, these tomes seldom address the crucial matter of cost. Putting a Price Tag on the Common Core: How Much Will Smart Implementation Cost? estimates the implementation cost for each of the forty-five states (and the District of Columbia) that have adopted the Common Core State Standards and shows that costs naturally depend on how states approach implementation. Authors Patrick J. Murphy of the University of San Francisco and Elliot Regenstein of EducationCounsel LLC illustrate this with three models:

May 2012

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Supporting Instruction: Investing in Teaching

Education and Literacy

Supporting Instruction: Investing in Teaching

Describes the foundation's work in supporting the Common Core State Standards for literacy and math and a design collaborative developing tools for teachers to help students meet them, including template tasks, instructional modules, and courses.

December 2010

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Common Core and the Future of Student Assessment in Ohio, The

Education and Literacy, Nonprofits and Philanthropy

Common Core and the Future of Student Assessment in Ohio, The

Ohio committed itself to embracing higher standards that cross state lines when it joined 45 other states and the District of Columbia in adopting the Common Core standards in math and English language arts (ELA) in June 2010.

August 2011

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio, Africa (Eastern)-Uganda

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