An Appeal to All Americans: National Commission on Civic Investment in Public Education

Education and Literacy

An Appeal to All Americans: National Commission on Civic Investment in Public Education

A national commission comprised of top education and philanthropic leaders is calling with new urgency for an increase in the nation's commitment to and civic investment in public education. An Appeal to All Americans also represents the first national and independently authored report to outline standards of practice for public and local education funds.

As federal and state governments make dramatic cuts to public education funding, the independent National Commission on Civic Investment in Public Education urges the public to redouble its efforts to ensure that the nation's public schools provide a high-quality education for all young people.

The Commission, created by Public Education Network (PEN), was charged with making a renewed case for civic investment, highlighting the work of organizations that can build and channel that investment, and developing standards for the rapidly-rising number of citizendriven, local public education assistance organizations - local education funds (LEFs), school foundations, etc. - working throughout our nation to improve public schools.

May 2011

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Macon County-Decatur, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Connecticut-Fairfield County-Bridgeport, North America-United States (Southern)-Alabama-Mobile County, North America-United States (Southern)-Florida-Hillsborough County, North America-United States (Southern)-Maryland-Carroll County-Westminster, North America-United States (Western)-Washington-King County-Seattle

Alabama Faith Council Statement on Public Education

Education and Literacy

Alabama Faith Council Statement on Public Education

There are countless statistics showing that Alabama's schools inadequately prepare the state's 740,000 public school students for the future. Our students are less likely to read on grade level or graduate on time. Nationwide comparisons of student learning show that Alabama schools trail most of the country. Our schools do not effectively teach all children, leading to achievement gaps between different groups of students. And even the best performing groups of students in Alabama compare unfavorably with their peers from other states. To the further disadvantage of our neediest children, the best-prepared and most-experienced teachers are distributed unevenly throughout the state. Public school advocates must accept that there are no easy solutions or quick fixes for a complex education system serving an ever-changing student population. Character development must be an essential component of our educational objectives. Money is part of a solution not a panacea. The good news is two-fold: Alabama's children are beginning to post significant learning gains, and there are known methods to improve student learning and ultimately help every child succeed in life.

January 2009

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southern)-Alabama

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