Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California

Children and Youth;Education and Literacy

Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California

The After School Division (ASD) of the California Department of Education in collaboration with Public Profit, has released Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California. This report shares high-level information about the availability of technical assistance (TA) by region, strategy, and links to Quality Standards for Expanded Learning. Regional Profiles provide at-a-glance information about providers in each of California's 11 regions.

This report will help to inform the ongoing conversations about how to support high quality Expanded Learning Opportunities in California for all youth. California is a national leader in Expanded Learning, both for the breadth of its publicly funded Expanded Learning programs and for its growing focus on quality. THe ASD is further enhancing its supports for program quality through the System of Support, including fuding for TA. Understanding the current TA landscape enahnces the ASD's ability to make strategic investments to support Expanded Learning Opportunities.

May 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Degrees of Freedom: Expanding College Opportunities - for Currently and Formerly Incarcerated Californians

Education and Literacy;Prison and Judicial Reform

Degrees of Freedom: Expanding College Opportunities - for Currently and Formerly Incarcerated Californians

This report begins with a background on the higher education and criminal justice systems in California. This background section highlights the vocabulary and common pathways for each system, and provides a primer on California community colleges. Part II explains why California needs this initiative. Part III presents the landscape of existing college programs dedicated to criminal justice-involved populations in the community and in jails and prisons. This landscape identifies promising strategies and sites of innovation across the state, as well as current challenges to sustaining and expanding these programs. Part IV lays out concrete recommendations California should take to realize the vision of expanding high-quality college opportunities for currently and formerly incarcerated individuals. It includes guidelines for developing high-quality, sustainable programs, building and strengthening partnerships, and shaping the policy landscape, both by using existing opportunities and by advocating for specific legislative and policy changes. Profiles of current college students and graduates with criminal records divide the sections and offer first-hand accounts of the joys and challenges of a college experience.

March 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Black Male Achievement and Early School Attendance

Education and Literacy, Men, Race and Ethnicity

Black Male Achievement and Early School Attendance

Chronic absence from preschool and elementary school -- defined here as missing at least 10% of the school year, regardless of whether or not the absences are excused -- is a key contributor to poorer educational outcomes of black males later in life. The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has partnered with the Campaign for Black Male Achievement to produce a factsheet on this topic, as well as other resources.

January 2013

Geographic Focus: North America-United States, North America-United States (Western)-California-Alameda County-Oakland

In and Beyond Schools: Putting More Youth on the Path to Success with Integrated Support

Education and Literacy

In and Beyond Schools: Putting More Youth on the Path to Success with Integrated Support

As it becomes increasingly clear that a rich set of skills beyond academic knowledge is needed to thrive in college and career, schools must create the learning environments that help youth develop the range of knowledge, skills, and mindsets that research links to postsecondary success. In 2010-2011, 83,469 California youth left school without a high school diploma. Just 65 percent of 2008 California high school graduates enrolled in a postsecondary program shortly after high school.

Only 63 percent of those attending four-year colleges completed a degree within six years, and 31 percent of those attending two-year colleges graduated within three years.These patterns are not specific to California. Across the nation, a young person's socioeconomic background correlates highly with academic outcomes. The pattern is particularly troubling because an individual's level of education has a direct correlation with future earnings and other measures of life quality.

Schools are struggling to help more youth develop the increasingly complex body of knowledge, skills, and mindsets they need to succeed in college, careers, and civic life. In and Beyond Schools argues that building these skills and knowledge requires an integrated approach to youth development, one that leverages the expertise of schools and community resources beyond schools. As schools develop richer learning environments that nurture a broader range of psychosocial skills, this work can be enabled and accelerated through community partnerships that help schools build and complement their own strengths. Public and nonprofit organizations and agencies that work with young people beyond the school day often have experience developing many of the qualities and skills that research associates with college and career success. However, their expertise and resources are underutilized in the absence of sufficient incentives, structures, and policies to systematically align their work with public schools.

April 2014

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

The Retention of Chicago's Arts Students in Comparative Perspective

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

The Retention of Chicago's Arts Students in Comparative Perspective

Highlights:

* 58 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni took up residence in the city within 5 years of the date of their last attendance. Of the regions compared in this report, only New York City has a greater portion of its arts-school alumni taking up residence in the city within 5 years, at 66 percent.

* 51 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni were out-of-state applicants who came to Chicago and were still living in the city within five years of their last date of attendance. This is the second highest portion of out-of-state applicants taking up residence in the city of their alma mater. New York City's rate was highest at 54 percent.

* Of arts-school alumni who searched for work, 38 percent of those attending school in Chicago obtained work prior to leaving their institution; 85 percent obtained work within a year. Alumni from other regions had similar experiences.

*50 percent of Chicago's alumni reported that their first job or work experience was "closely related" to their arts-school training. However, alumni from institutions in Los Angeles County, Cleveland/Columbus and New York City reported higher rates of their first work experience being closely related to their arts training.

May 2014

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Chicago Metropolitan Area, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio-Cuyahoga County-Cleveland, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio-Franklin County-Columbus, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Massachusetts-Middlesex County-Cambridge, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Massachusetts-Suffolk County-Boston, North America-United States (Northeastern)-New York-New York County-New York City, North America-United States (Western)-California (San Francisco Bay Area), North America-United States (Western)-California-Los Angeles County

Developing a Performance Assessment System From the Ground Up: Lessons Learned From Three Linked Learning Pathways

Education and Literacy

Developing a Performance Assessment System From the Ground Up: Lessons Learned From Three Linked Learning Pathways

This document is designed to offer practitioners -- teachers, principals, and central office administrators -- models, tools, and examples from the Linked Learning field for developing a performance assessment system. This document describes the challenges and successes practitioners encountered when developing and implementing authentic performance-based assessment practices and systems in Linked Learning pathways as well as the conditions that enabled this work. It is the product of a 1-year study of three grade-level teams, located in three different Linked Learning pathways across California. These teams participated in a 2-year performance assessment demonstration project led by ConnectEd and Envision.

February 2014

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Student-Centered Learning: Life Academy of Health and Bioscience

Education and Literacy

Student-Centered Learning: Life Academy of Health and Bioscience

This case study is one of four written by SCOPE about student-centered practices in schools.

The case studies address the following questions:

1. What are the effects of student-centered learning approaches on student engagement, achievement of knowledge and skills, and attainment (high school graduation, college admission, and college continuation and success), in particular for underserved students?

2. What specific practices, approaches, and contextual factors result in these outcomes?The cases focus on the structures, practices, and conditions in the four schools that enable students to experience positive outcomes and consider the ways in which these factors are interrelated and work to reinforce each other.

January 2014

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California-Alameda County-Oakland

Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste. Fraud and Abuse

Education and Literacy

Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste. Fraud and Abuse

This report echoes a warning from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of the Inspector General. The report draws upon news reports, criminal complaints and more to detail how, in just 15 of the 42 states that have charter schools, charter operators have used school funds illegally to buy personal luxuries for themselves, support their other businesses, and more. The report also includes recommendations for policymakers on how they can address the problem of rampant fraud, waste and abuse in the charter school industry. Both organizations recommend pausing charter expansion until these problems are addressed.

May 2014

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southwestern)-Arizona, North America-United States (Southern)-Louisiana, North America-United States (Southern)-Florida, North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Pennsylvania, North America-United States (Northeastern)-New York, North America-United States (Western)-Hawaii, North America-United States (Western)-Colorado, North America-United States (Western)-California, North America-United States (Northeastern)-New Jersey, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Wisconsin, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Minnesota, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois, North America-United States (Southwestern)-Texas

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