Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California

Children and Youth;Education and Literacy

Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California

The After School Division (ASD) of the California Department of Education in collaboration with Public Profit, has released Technical Assistance for Expanded Learning Opportunities in California. This report shares high-level information about the availability of technical assistance (TA) by region, strategy, and links to Quality Standards for Expanded Learning. Regional Profiles provide at-a-glance information about providers in each of California's 11 regions.

This report will help to inform the ongoing conversations about how to support high quality Expanded Learning Opportunities in California for all youth. California is a national leader in Expanded Learning, both for the breadth of its publicly funded Expanded Learning programs and for its growing focus on quality. THe ASD is further enhancing its supports for program quality through the System of Support, including fuding for TA. Understanding the current TA landscape enahnces the ASD's ability to make strategic investments to support Expanded Learning Opportunities.

May 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Degrees of Freedom: Expanding College Opportunities - for Currently and Formerly Incarcerated Californians

Education and Literacy;Prison and Judicial Reform

Degrees of Freedom: Expanding College Opportunities - for Currently and Formerly Incarcerated Californians

This report begins with a background on the higher education and criminal justice systems in California. This background section highlights the vocabulary and common pathways for each system, and provides a primer on California community colleges. Part II explains why California needs this initiative. Part III presents the landscape of existing college programs dedicated to criminal justice-involved populations in the community and in jails and prisons. This landscape identifies promising strategies and sites of innovation across the state, as well as current challenges to sustaining and expanding these programs. Part IV lays out concrete recommendations California should take to realize the vision of expanding high-quality college opportunities for currently and formerly incarcerated individuals. It includes guidelines for developing high-quality, sustainable programs, building and strengthening partnerships, and shaping the policy landscape, both by using existing opportunities and by advocating for specific legislative and policy changes. Profiles of current college students and graduates with criminal records divide the sections and offer first-hand accounts of the joys and challenges of a college experience.

March 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Black Male Achievement and Early School Attendance

Education and Literacy, Men, Race and Ethnicity

Black Male Achievement and Early School Attendance

Chronic absence from preschool and elementary school -- defined here as missing at least 10% of the school year, regardless of whether or not the absences are excused -- is a key contributor to poorer educational outcomes of black males later in life. The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has partnered with the Campaign for Black Male Achievement to produce a factsheet on this topic, as well as other resources.

December 2012

Geographic Focus: North America-United States, North America-United States (Western)-California-Alameda County-Oakland

James Irvine Foundation 2010 Annual Performance Report

Arts and Culture;Education and Literacy;Nonprofits and Philanthropy

James Irvine Foundation 2010 Annual Performance Report

Combines the foundation's annual report and annual performance report. Includes letter from the board chair and analyses of the foundation's 2010 grantmaking, program impact, and effectiveness.

June 2011

Geographic Focus: North America / United States (Western) / California

Student Debt and the Value of a College Degree

Education and Literacy

Student Debt and the Value of a College Degree

Skyrocketing tuition and fees, increasing student debt, and a weak economy have led many to wonder whether the benets of going to college are worth the costs. More students than ever are taking on student loans -- a troubling trend that suggests that college is becoming less accessible to many students, even as our economy requires greater numbers of highly educated workers. In this report, the authors review the status of undergraduate student debt in California and consider it in light of the economic benets of attaining a college degree.

This report finds that student debt has increased notably in recent years. In 2010, almost half of California freshmen took out a student loan -- ten years earlier, only one-third did so. Moreover, the size of those loans has increased. The average loan amount for freshmen in California increased 36 percent (adjusted for inflation) between 2005 and 2010, reaching almost $8,000 for that first year alone. Students at private colleges are much more likely than students at the state's public colleges to take out loans, and the amounts of those loans are substantially higher at private institutions. Of particular concern are students at private for-profit colleges.

Almost all students attending those institutions take out loans, and the loan amounts are higher than at any other type of institution. Despite the increase in debt, college is a good investment for the vast majority of students. Labor market outcomes, including employment and wages, remain far better for college graduates than for less educated workers, and all but the lowest-paid college graduates earn sufficient wages to pay off average debts. However, certain students do not fare so well.

Those who do not finish college have far lower earning potential than those who do. And a small share of students take out massive loans and have trouble paying them back. Default rates are particularly high for students who attend private for-profit colleges. By keeping tuition low in the past (and even now at community colleges) and, more recently, by expanding grant aid to those attending public institutions, California policymakers and higher education officials have ensured that student debt is lower in California than in the rest of the United States. Relatively high graduation rates coupled with strong labor market outcomes have kept default rates on student loans very low for attendees of the University of California and the California State University, and at almost all private nonprofit colleges. Efforts by policymakers to limit state aid to institutions with poor student outcomes, including high student loan default rates, should continue. Almost all of the poorly performing schools are private for-profit institutions.

In an era with seemingly ever-increasing college tuition, the state should find additional ways to make college affordable for greater numbers of Californians. Improving pathways from community colleges, with their very low tuition, to four-year colleges should be a high priority. The new associate degree for transfer is a step in the right direction. Finding ways to help families save for college should be another state priority. One option would be to create a college savings program that guarantees full tuition at the state's public universities. Numerous states have adopted such programs, and hundreds of thousands of families are participating in them. Finally, to keep costs down, state policymakers and higher education officials need to ensure adequate funding of higher education institutions, as well as eciency in the delivery of higher education. Online offerings are one -- as yet unproven -- possibility for efficiency gains.

Ultimately, the significance of a college education is larger than the gains enjoyed by any one person. California's future prosperity depends on public policies that promote college enrollment and completion for increasing numbers of Californians.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California

Report of the Commission on the Future of the UC Berkeley Library

Education and Literacy

Report of the Commission on the Future of the UC Berkeley Library

The UC Berkeley Library was founded with the University in 1868. From an initial collection of 1,000 volumes it has grown to include over 11 million volumes. Housed in several dozen physical libraries throughout the campus, the Library provided patrons 2.7 million physical items and 33 million article downloads in 2012. Globally, the Library has millions of exchanges with users through in-person visits, circulation requests, and online or phone conversations about research questions. Second only to the University's homepage, the Library website is perhaps the most visible face of our University to the world and the most tangible demonstration of its core values: excellence and access.

The University and the Library cannot exist without each other. Because the Library -- in both its physical and virtual forms -- is ubiquitous in the everyday lives of faculty, students, administrative staff, scholarly researchers, and the general public worldwide, it is difficult to make a case for its role in sustaining the academic preeminence of the University except by imagining our University and our world without it. There is simply no great University without a great Library. The Library is the heart and circulatory system of our research and instructional mission; it is the essential pump that takes in the life-blood of learning and circulates it throughout the campus community and beyond our walls to our furthest public extremities; it makes research happen; it makes learning possible; it draws new learning back into the system only to generate more learning and send it out to circulate again.

The Commission has concluded that the centrality of the Library to the range of learning and research at Berkeley warrants a serious strategy of major reinvestment. The Library, aided by the campus administration and the Academic Senate, should devise a detailed execution plan for this reinvestment, along the lines of the Commission's recommendations, coupled with a plan of both cost-saving and revenue-generating measures. To face the challenges of the next twenty years the Library should align its organizational structure and its institutional culture with the rapidly changing needs of faculty research and student learning. The campus community as a whole should assume the financial and intellectual responsibility of active partnership in this important endeavor. Because the health of the entire academic enterprise depends upon the Library, there should be no higher priority for campus investment and no greater responsibility for the Campus Administration and the Academic Senate than the effective stewardship of the Library.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California-Alameda County-Berkeley

ARISE 2009 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

Arts and Culture, Children and Youth, Education and Literacy

ARISE 2009 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

This is the second of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2008-09 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 22 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California-San Francisco County-San Francisco

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