Afterschool in Action: How Innovative Afterschool Programs Address Critical Issues Facing Middle School Youth

Children and Youth, Education and Literacy

Afterschool in Action: How Innovative Afterschool Programs Address Critical Issues Facing Middle School Youth

With support from MetLife Foundation, the Afterschool Alliance presents this compendium, containing a series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth, schools and communities, and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. The four issue briefs featured in this publication address: the importance of aligning afterschool with the school day, bullying awareness and prevention, service-learning opportunities and literacy education. Each brief combines relevant statistics, comments from experts and community leaders, and examples of outstanding afterschool programs. The compendium also includes profiles of successful programs and a discussion of the MetLife Foundation Afterschool Innovator Award.

The 2011 MetLife Foundation Afterschool Innovator Award winners are:

  • Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools - New Orleans, LA
  • Higher Achievement - Washington, D.C.
  • Urban Arts/Project Phoenix - Oakland, CA
  • 21st Century PASOS - Gettysburg, PA
  • America SCORES - Chicago, IL

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Cook County-Chicago, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Pennsylvania-Adams County-Gettysburg, North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington, North America-United States (Southern)-Louisiana-Orleans Parish-New Orleans, North America-United States (Western)-California-Alameda County-Oakland

Arts Education for All: Lessons From the First Half of the Ford Foundation's National Arts Education Initiative

Arts and Culture, Nonprofits and Philanthropy

Arts Education for All: Lessons From the First Half of the Ford Foundation's National Arts Education Initiative

Provides an overview of an initiative to expand access to integrated arts education with partnership building, advocacy, and strategic communications activities. Discusses Ford's theory of change, challenges, lessons learned, and case summaries.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California, North America-United States (Southern)-Maryland, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Minnesota, North America-United States (Southern)-Mississippi, North America-United States, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio, North America-United States (Southwestern)-Texas, North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington

Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste. Fraud and Abuse

Education and Literacy

Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste. Fraud and Abuse

This report echoes a warning from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of the Inspector General. The report draws upon news reports, criminal complaints and more to detail how, in just 15 of the 42 states that have charter schools, charter operators have used school funds illegally to buy personal luxuries for themselves, support their other businesses, and more. The report also includes recommendations for policymakers on how they can address the problem of rampant fraud, waste and abuse in the charter school industry. Both organizations recommend pausing charter expansion until these problems are addressed.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southwestern)-Arizona, North America-United States (Southern)-Louisiana, North America-United States (Southern)-Florida, North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington, North America-United States (Northeastern)-Pennsylvania, North America-United States (Northeastern)-New York, North America-United States (Western)-Hawaii, North America-United States (Western)-Colorado, North America-United States (Western)-California, North America-United States (Northeastern)-New Jersey, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Wisconsin, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Minnesota, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois, North America-United States (Southwestern)-Texas

District of Columbia School Equity Reports: 2013 - Part Two

Education and Literacy

District of Columbia School Equity Reports: 2013 - Part Two

These reports, supported by the non-profit education innovation organization NewSchools Venture Fund, focus on the retention, discipline, academic growth and achievement of all students and moves the District closer to having a complete and transparent view, using the same metrics, of how different public schools serve a range of students. This is part two of two.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington

Blurring Boundaries: Transforming Place, Policies, and Partnerships for Postsecondary Education Attainment in Metropolitan Areas

Education and Literacy;Race and Ethnicity

Blurring Boundaries: Transforming Place, Policies, and Partnerships for Postsecondary Education Attainment in Metropolitan Areas

By 2020, more than six out of 10 U.S. jobs will require postsecondary training. Despite a slight increase in college attainment nationally in recent years, the fastest-growing minority groups are being left behind. Only 25 and 18 percent of Blacks and Hispanics, respectively, hold at least an associate's degree, compared with 39 percent of Whites. Without substantial increases in educational attainment, particularly for our nation's already underserved groups, the United States will have a difficult time developing a robust economy.

Home to 65 percent of Americans, and a majority of all African Americans and Hispanics (74 and 79 percent, respectively), the 100 largest metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) can play a strong role in developing this nation's workforce. In fact, to reach a national attainment target that meets our workforce needs, more than half of college degrees could be generated from the these cities. The majority of degrees needed among African-American and Hispanic adults could also be produced in MSAs.

Clearly, investing in and organizing around the potential of metropolitan areas is critical, and the stakes have never been higher. Yet the current funding climate requires strategic public and private partnerships to invest in education innovation and human capital development in order to have the most robust impact on sustainable national growth. For this study, the Institute for Higher Education (IHEP) sought to follow up on its previous work examining MSA educational attainment rates by further exploring policies that either inhibit or facilitate degree production, and identifying metropolitan-level, cross-section collaborations that help local leaders contribute to national completion goals.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington;North America-United States (Southern)-Maryland-Baltimore;North America-United States (Southern)-Tennessee-Shelby County-Memphis;North America-United States (Western)-Nebraska-Douglas County-Omaha

Smallest Victims of the Foreclosure Crisis: Children in the District of Columbia

Children and Youth, Community and Economic Development, Education and Literacy, Housing and Homelessness

Smallest Victims of the Foreclosure Crisis: Children in the District of Columbia

Examines trends in the number of public school students affected by the foreclosure crisis, their demographic characteristics, and concentration by neighborhood or school. Discusses implications for housing and education agencies and providers.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington

Connecting Youth to Opportunity: Better Understanding the Needs of Disconnected Young People in Washington, DC

Children and Youth, Education and Literacy

Connecting Youth to Opportunity: Better Understanding the Needs of Disconnected Young People in Washington, DC

Educational attainment defines workforce success, and a robust workforce drives economic stability and growth. Therefore, everyone has a stake in developing systems that promote strong education outcomes and successful transitions to the labor market: businesses and employers that aim to simultaneously build up the next generation of consumers and strengthen the future workforce; elected officials who wish to sustain the city's current prosperity and growth; parents and concerned community members who want a vibrant, healthy community; and youth themselves, who by and large want to lead stable, productive lives.

Momentum has been building -- now is the time for the District of Columbia to develop such a system. Recent studies suggest thousands of youth between the ages of 16 -- 24 are disconnected, which is commonly understood to mean young people who are neither in school nor working. High dropout and unemployment rates and low post-secondary education attainment rates among District youth have led to a series of thoughtful and focused examinations of how the District of Columbia can reconnect youth to opportunity. Raise DC, the District's public/private partnership dedicated to establishing cradle to career alignment, is leading the charge with its focus on youth reconnection. This -- combined with the engagement of the foundation sector on the needs of disconnected youth and the recognition of other government and community working groups on this emerging and high-need sector of the youth population -- has opened the window of opportunity to combat youth disconnection through cohesive, evidence-driven, and cross-sector systems change.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington

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