Learning From Student Voice: Are Students Engaged?

Children and Youth;Education and Literacy

Learning From Student Voice: Are Students Engaged?

When students have a love of learning and a desire to succeed ─ when they are genuinely engaged with their school and their education ─ they are more likely to learn. Since student engagement is a leading indicator of academic achievement and persistence in school as well as a key element of school climate, educators can greatly benefit from measuring it. So, what does engagement look like, according to the students themselves? To answer this question, YouthTruth analyzed survey responses from over 230,000 students in grades three through twelve. The data was gathered between November 2012 and June 2017 through YouthTruth's anonymous online climate and culture survey, administered in partnership with school districts and charter management organizations across 36 states. Our analysis looked at a subset of questions related to student engagement and uncovered some key insights.

December 2017

Geographic Focus: North America / United States

2015-2016 Summer Melt Texting Initiative: Lessons Learned on What it Takes to Launch a Program

Education and Literacy;Nonprofits and Philanthropy;Race and Ethnicity

2015-2016 Summer Melt Texting Initiative: Lessons Learned on What it Takes to Launch a Program

At Great Lakes we focus on helping students of color, students from low-income families and those who are the first in theirfamilies to attend college. These underserved students have the most to gain from earning a degree or credential, but face the steepest challenges in getting there. One of the first barriers they need to overcome is "summer melt." The purpose of this report is to share lessons learned by three high school districts during the development and launch of a summer melt texting program.

October 2017

Geographic Focus: North America / United States (Midwestern) / Wisconsin

Young Black America Part One: High School Completion Rates are at their Highest Ever

Education and Literacy;Race and Ethnicity

Young Black America Part One: High School Completion Rates are at their Highest Ever

By most measures, the educational attainment of blacks is currently at the highest it has ever been. After decades of stagnation, high school completion rates for blacks have increased rapidly since 2000. This issue brief will focus on the high school status completion rates of blacks ages 20 to 24 since 1975. Future reports will focus on other issues facing young blacks, including college graduation rates, unemployment rates, wages, and poverty rates.

March 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

White Paper: College Access and Retention of Career and Technical Education Graduates

Children and Youth;Education and Literacy;Employment and Labor

White Paper: College Access and Retention of Career and Technical Education Graduates

This White Paper on post secondary access and persistence of career and technical education (CTE) graduates, particularly those with disabilities, is produced in collaboration with the Center for Labor and Market Studies at Northeastern University. Currently, little is known about the actual post secondary enrollment of graduates from Massachusetts public high schools and less is known about the post secondary outcomes of the subset of high school graduates with disabilities. Yet, the labor market environment that these young adults will enter is one characterized by a large and growing lifetime earnings advantage to earning a college degree. The findings are based on data about nearly 4,600 high school students from the Classes of 2004 through 2006 who graduated from seven vocational-technical high schools in Massachusetts.

Geographic Focus:

Opportunity by Design: New High School Models for Student Success

Education and Literacy

Opportunity by Design: New High School Models for Student Success

Schools throughout the country will soon begin to implement the Common Core State Standards and adopt the Next Generation Science Standards. These new standards, which are "fewer, clearer, and higher" than existing state standards, are designed to provide all young people with the knowledge and skills they need for success in a global economy.

Though they are a powerful tool for improving our educational system, standards alone cannot deliver widespread, meaningful change. To bring all students to much higher levels of achievement and to help underprepared students catch up to meet the standards' new demands, we must "do school differently." This means redesigning how schools use teaching, time, technology, and money to create opportunities for more young people to succeed. And, it means replacing existing one-size-fits-all approaches with rigorous, personalized learning that creates multiple opportunities for students to be successful.

Individual interventions are important, yet by themselves, they are not likely to produce sufficiently strong outcomes to help all students meet the demands of the new standards. Instead of retooling individual elements such as teacher preparation, learning time, or technology in isolation, all the elements that we know work and some emerging tools must be integrated into comprehensive school designs that will truly meet the needs of every student.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

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