PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 2: Impact of PAIR on Student Academic Performance

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 2: Impact of PAIR on Student Academic Performance

This report is the second part of a three-part comprehensive report filed by both Dr. Burnaford and Dr. Scripp, as Co-Principal Investigators of the PAIR project.

The first report, written by Dr. Gail Burnaford [2010], focused primarily on three years of collecting evidence of progress meeting PAIR teacher professional development goals, the evolution of teacher professional development outcomes in comparison with control group teachers, and speculation on theg eneral impact of high quality PAIRteacher practices on student learning.

The second and third parts of this report, written by Dr. Lawrence Scripp and his research team from the Center for Music-in-Education and CAPE (2011-2012], focus on the impact of PAIR on student learning. This second report (2011) reports primarily on differences among control-treatment statistical comparisons of PAIR student academic test outcomes. The following third report (2012) features an extensive review of qualitative and quantitative aspects all PAIR student arts integration outcome data. In addition, it provides a comprehensive analysis of the possible statistical links between seven teacher professional development factors and four student learning outcomes.

In this paper reports on a research project in arts integration education, conducted in the Chicago Public Schools in partnership with Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE), a research-based organization focused on optimizing the impact of artists and arts learning in schools for the benefit of whole-school improvement in arts learning, teacher professional development, and school culture.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Cook County-Chicago

Arts Corps Program Evaluation Report

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

Arts Corps Program Evaluation Report

Founded in 2000 on the principle that all young people -- not just those with resources -- should have access to quality arts learning opportunities, Arts Corps is now a leading nonprofit arts education organization in Seattle. Starting with just a few classes at six sites, Arts Corps now serves over 2,000 K-12th grade students a year at approximately 40 sites.

Arts Corps places after-school classes and in-school residencies primarily at schools and community centers serving low-income youth who often have few other opportunities for arts learning. Programs cover the spectrum of arts disciplines from dance to visual arts to photography to music, and include popular classes such as Brazilian dance, theater, comic illustration, spoken word, sculpture and more. Programming is designed to foster artistic competencies and creative habits of mind such as imagination, healthy risk-taking, reflection, persistence and critical thinking. The program operates on a school year, with select workshops occurring in the summer months.

Arts Corps has conducted program evaluation since inception and has refined its focus each year to better explore and describe the impacts of arts classes on students. This report represents Arts Corps' evaluation work during the 2011-2012 program year.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-Washington-King County-Seattle

Arts for All School Arts Survey: Measuring Quality, Access and Equity in Arts Education

Education and Literacy

Arts for All School Arts Survey: Measuring Quality, Access and Equity in Arts Education

As part of its goal to make quality, sequential arts education a reality in all public K-12 classrooms in Los Angeles County, Arts for All connects school districts with effective tools and resources to improve arts learning. The Arts for All School Arts Survey: Measuring Quality, Access and Equity in Arts Education is the most recent of these tools to be introduced. It was developed to measure access to and quality of arts instruction at the school site level as well as to develop a system for collecting and reporting the data. The results are useful to schools and school districts to find out what is working, what's not working, and to point the way toward improvement. But the results can also provide a picture of what's happening across a region.

The following summary describes how the survey was built and its first test in five school districts encompassing 100 schools. As a result of this test, some refinements will be made in the survey, but the survey's strength and utility have been proven. Los Angeles County now has a means of objectively measuring quality and access to arts education and making the results easily accessible.

Geographic Focus:

Visual Arts Education in Chicago Public Schools: A Research Study

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

Visual Arts Education in Chicago Public Schools: A Research Study

In the summer of 2010, the Chicago Community Trust (CCT) commissioned four organizations representing four arts disciplines treated in the Chicago Guide for Teaching and Learning in the Arts (the Guide) -- visual arts, dance, theater, and music -- to undertake a project to better understand arts education programs offered to Chicago Public School (CPS) students and teachers by arts organizations. The Art Institute of Chicago was commissioned to lead the visual arts education portion of the project.

The overarching goal for the initiative was to identify how arts organizations can more effectively serve CPS students through arts education programming. Specifically, this included a better understanding of the current capacity of visual arts education organizations as well as factors that could improve the quantity and effectiveness of visual arts education programming for CPS students and teachers.

The overarching goal for the initiative was to identify how arts organizations can more effectively serve CPS students through arts education programming. Specifically this included a better understanding of the current capacity of visual arts education programming. Specifically, this included a better understanding of the current capacity of visual arts education organization as well as factors that could improve the quantity and effectiveness of visual arts education programming for CPS students and teachers.

The primary components of the project were an in-depth online survey and two sets of focus groups, together whcih sought to create a picture of the current capacity of visual arts organizations to collectively serve Chicago Public Schools and teachers. These tools were also intended to identify the opportunities for further development of visual arts programs and to generate a set of recommendations to funders, to CPS, and to the visual arts sector itself.

Of the 124 organizations that were identified as serving CPS with visual arts education programming, 67 responded to the survey and 36 attended one of the focus group sessions. Two organizations participated in at least one focus group, but did not complete the survey, 20 participated in at least one focus group and completed the survey, while ten participated in both focus groups as well as completing the survey, In collecting survey data, organizations were asked about the format used in their projects.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Cook County-Chicago

Arts Advantage: Expanding Arts Education in the Boston Public Schools, The

Arts and Culture;Education and Literacy

Arts Advantage: Expanding Arts Education in the Boston Public Schools, The

Presents findings from a survey on the availability of arts education in the city's public schools, relevant school traits, funding needs, and partners. Offers recommendations and strategies for a three-year expansion plan. Highlights best practices.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Northeastern)-Massachusetts-Suffolk County-Boston;North America-United States (Northeastern)-Massachusetts

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 1: Teacher Impact

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 1: Teacher Impact

Forty years ago, there was widespread belief that teachers and schools had little influence on students' achievement independent of their socioeconomic background and context. More recent studies of teacher effects at the classroom level, however, such as those using the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System, have found that differential teacher effectiveness is a strong determinant of differences in student learning, far outweighing the effects of differences in class size and heterogeneity.

Students who are assigned to several ineffective teachers in a row have significantly lower achievement and gains in achievement than those who are assigned to several highly effective teachers in sequence. Teacher effects appear to be additive and cumulative, and generally not compensatory. These issues have been the topic of much other research over the last 50 years . More and more research is conducted with teacher practice and professional development as part of the context for investigating student outcomes. That is what the PAIR project has done during this research initiative.

The Partnerships in Arts Integration Research (PAIR) project was a three-year initiative focused on the intersections between arts and non-arts content learning in two mathematics and science, two world languages and two writing Magnet Cluster Schools in Chicago. This section of the final report will focus on the impact of the project on the teachers, with particular attention to the third year of the project in which documentation was more intentional and systematic in each school. The 6 PAIR schools were matched with 6 control schools also in the Arts Magnet Cluster Schools program in Chicago Public Schools. A Year-End Curriculum and Teaching Survey was administered to 4th, 5thand 6th grade teachers in all twelve schools during Year Three of the project. Other data were also collected from the teachers in the 6 PAIR schools, including professional development session surveys and attendance figures, portfolio conference transcribed comments, student work and teacher practice labels and documentation from work completed at professional development sessions (documentation panels and curriculum maps).

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Cook County-Chicago

Arts Education for All: Lessons From the First Half of the Ford Foundation's National Arts Education Initiative

Arts and Culture, Nonprofits and Philanthropy

Arts Education for All: Lessons From the First Half of the Ford Foundation's National Arts Education Initiative

Provides an overview of an initiative to expand access to integrated arts education with partnership building, advocacy, and strategic communications activities. Discusses Ford's theory of change, challenges, lessons learned, and case summaries.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Western)-California, North America-United States (Southern)-Maryland, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Minnesota, North America-United States (Southern)-Mississippi, North America-United States, North America-United States (Midwestern)-Ohio, North America-United States (Southwestern)-Texas, North America-United States (Southern)-District of Columbia-Washington

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