Breaking Down Walls: Increasing Access to Four-Year Colleges for High-Achieving Community College Students

Education and Literacy

Breaking Down Walls: Increasing Access to Four-Year Colleges for High-Achieving Community College Students

Results from this study show that upon transferring to a four-year school, community college students do more than just "get by" -- they equal or surpass their peers at their new schools. Recent analyses from the National Student Clearinghouse indicate that nationally 60 percent of community college students who manage to transfer earn their bachelor's degree within four years. The highest performing college students do even better: 97 percent of Cooke Scholars earn their bachelor's degree in three years. Since 59 percent of bachelor's degree students graduate within six years, transfer students are completing their four-year degrees actually at a higher rate than students who came straight out of high school. The recent research and the experience of the Cooke Scholars makes it simply undeniable that community college transfer students are just as competent as students who begin their studies at a four-year college, and maybe more so.

January 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Carnegie Unit: A Century-Old Standard in a Changing Education Landscape, The

Education and Literacy

Carnegie Unit: A Century-Old Standard in a Changing Education Landscape, The

The result of a two-year study, the report examines the history of the influential, century-old Carnegie Unit and its impact on education reform in K-12 and higher education. The study finds that the Carnegie Unit remains the central organizing feature of the vast American education system, from elementary school to graduate school, and provides students with an important opportunity-to-learn standard. But at best, the Carnegie Unit is a crude proxy for student learning. The U.S. education system needs more informative measures of student performance. Achieving this goal would require the development of rigorous standards, assessments, and accountability systems -- difficult work, especially in the field of higher education, where educational aims are highly varied and faculty autonomy is deeply engrained.

January 2015

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Lumina Foundation for Education: Can A Champion for College Attainment Up Its Game?

Education and Literacy;Nonprofits and Philanthropy

Lumina Foundation for Education: Can A Champion for College Attainment Up Its Game?

Established in 2000, Lumina Foundation for Education's mission is defined by a specific goal: to increase the proportion of Americans with college degrees, certificates and credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Overall, NCRP's review revealed a highly focused, effective foundation with savvy policy advocacy strategies, staff that are well respected and initiatives that are progressing ahead of schedule. However, in addition to investing in policy, Lumina should invest more in the community organizations whose support and input are critical to achieving success.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study

Education and Literacy;Race and Ethnicity

Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study

The report presents insights from interviews with successful male African-American college students, highlighting factors that helped them succeed in a range of contexts: getting to college, choosing colleges, paying for college, transitioning to college, matters of engagement, and responding productively to racism.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation

Arts and Culture, Education and Literacy, Race and Ethnicity

Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation

This report, commissioned from the NORC at the University of Chicago, investigates the relationship between arts education and arts participation, based on data from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts for 1982, 1992, 2002, and 2008. The report also examines long-term declines in Americans' reported rates of arts learning -- in creative writing, music, and the visual arts, among other disciplines. Authors Nick Rabkin and E.C. Hedberg find that the declines are not distributed evenly across all racial and ethnic groups.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States

Building a Birth-to-College Model: Professional Learning Communities

Education and Literacy

Building a Birth-to-College Model: Professional Learning Communities

The newest in a planned series of case studies on building a birth-to-college model of education released by the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute (UEI) and the Ounce of Prevention Fund outlines how to create professional learning communities (PLCs) of teachers, administrators and family support staff spanning the early childhood to K-12 spectrum.

The intent of the PLCs is to create environments where practitioners take the lead in collaboratively studying and piloting effective, developmentally informed practices that prepare children for college, beginning at birth.

Geographic Focus: North America-United States (Midwestern)-Illinois-Cook County-Chicago

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